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by Writing Workshops Staff

9 months ago


Blog

Writing the Hard Stuff: Navigating the Emotional Terrain of Your Writing

by Writing Workshops Staff

9 months ago


Writing the Hard Stuff: Navigating the Emotional Terrain of Your Writing

by Writing Workshops Staff

9 months ago


Sign up for Writing The Hard Stuff with Blaise Allysen Kearsley

Writing can be a powerful tool for self-expression and healing, but it can also be difficult and even painful. Whether you're writing about trauma, difficult emotions, or challenging topics, it can be hard to find the courage to put your thoughts and feelings down on paper. However, confronting the hard stuff in your writing can also be incredibly rewarding and liberating.

In this blog post, we'll explore strategies for approaching difficult writing without torturing yourself in the process. From considering the stories you've tucked away to understanding the risks and rewards of exploring sensitive topics, we'll dive into the practical and emotional aspects of writing the hard stuff.

First and foremost, it's important to understand that writing about difficult experiences can be triggering, and it's important to prioritize your own emotional well-being. You don't have to trigger yourself in order to write, and you should never feel obligated to put yourself in a potentially harmful situation. Instead, it's important to find a level of safety that works for you and to be mindful of your own boundaries and limitations.

When you're ready to start writing, consider the various strategies that can help you navigate the emotional terrain of your writing. For example, you might try writing in short bursts, using prompts or writing exercises to get started, or enlisting the support of a writing community or workshop.

Another important consideration is the role of humor in writing about difficult experiences. Humor can be a powerful tool for levity and perspective, but it's important to use it with care and sensitivity. You don't want to force the funny or make light of serious experiences, but incorporating humor in a thoughtful and intentional way can help you find balance and perspective in your writing.

Ultimately, writing the hard stuff can be a challenging and rewarding process, but it's important to take care of yourself along the way. Whether you're exploring trauma, difficult emotions, or challenging topics, writing can help you make sense of your experiences and find healing and growth in the process.

So, if you're ready to tackle the hard stuff in your writing, remember to prioritize your own well-being, find a supportive writing community, and be mindful of the strategies and tools that can help you navigate the emotional terrain of your writing with grace and insight.

And, the books below provide a powerful look into the human experience of overcoming trauma, and they serve as a source of inspiration and hope for those who have faced similar challenges.

 

  1. "Educated" by Tara Westover
  2. "The Glass Castle" by Jeanette Walls
  3. "The Liar's Club" by Mary Karr
  4. "The Year of Magical Thinking" by Joan Didion
  5. "The Color of Water" by James McBride
  6. "Night" by Elie Wiesel
  7. "The Fact of a Body: A Murder and a Memoir" by Alexandria Marzano-Lesnevich
  8. "Unbearable Lightness: A Story of Loss and Gain" by Portia de Rossi
  9. "The Light of the World" by Elizabeth Alexander
  10. "The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks" by Rebecca Skloot
  11. "The Autobiography of Malcolm X" by Malcolm X and Alex Haley
  12. "Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail" by Cheryl Strayed
  13. "The Color Purple" by Alice Walker

 

Sign up for Writing The Hard Stuff with Blaise Allysen Kearsley

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